The Invisible Web

Your Trip Into the Chapel Perilous

Posts Tagged ‘Douglas Rushkoff’

LET IT DIE: Rushkoff on the economy

Posted by invizweb on March 24, 2009

In a perfect world, the stock market would decline another 70 or 80 percent along with the shuttering of about that fraction of our nation’s banks. Yes, unemployment would rise as hundreds of thousands of formerly well-paid brokers and bankers lost their jobs; but at least they would no longer be extracting wealth at our expense. They would need to be fed, but that would be a lot cheaper than keeping them in the luxurious conditions they’re enjoying now. Even Bernie Madoff costs us less in jail than he does on Park Avenue.

Alas, I’m not being sarcastic. If you had spent the last decade, as I have, reviewing the way a centralized economic plan ravaged the real world over the past 500 years, you would appreciate the current financial meltdown for what it is: a comeuppance. This is the sound of the other shoe dropping; it’s what happens when the chickens come home to roost; it’s justice, equilibrium reasserting itself, and ultimately a good thing.

I started writing a book three years ago through which I hoped to help people see the artificial and ultimately dehumanizing landscape of corporatism on which we conduct so much of our lives. It’s not just that I saw the downturn coming—it’s that I feared it wouldn’t come quickly or clearly enough to help us wake up from the self-destructive fantasy of an eternally expanding economic frontier. The planet, and its people, were being taxed beyond their capacity to produce. Try arguing that to a banker whose livelihood is based on perpetuating that illusion, or to people whose retirement incomes depend on just one more generation falling for the scam. It’s like arguing to Brooklyn’s latest crop of brownstone buyers that they’ve invested in real estate at the very moment the whole market is about to tank. (I did; it wasn’t pretty.)

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Posted in Civil Liberties and Social Justice, Cryptopolitics, Current Events, Geopolitics, Philosophy & Religion & Spirituality | Tagged: | Leave a Comment »

Update on Genesis Breyer P-Orridge, founder of Throbbing Gristle and Psychic TV

Posted by invizweb on July 25, 2008

Written by Aaron Gell for RADAR magazine:

…Suddenly, Jaye came to. “What’s wrong, baby?” she asked, smiling.

Gen urged her to see a doctor, but Jaye refused. She’d been watching doctors in action for years at the hospital where she worked and didn’t want any part of it. Besides, she seemed fine—better than fine. She was full of life, invigorated, cheerful. The next few days were a whirlwind as she dragged Gen out shopping, cooked him special meals, ravished him. On October 8, after one especially passionate encounter, Gen dozed off, waking up to find Jaye slumped on the floor of the bathroom. He shouted to their handyman to call 911, and began giving her CPR. She breathed her last breath, he says, right into his lungs.

The cops were terrible. Okay, they wanted to know, who’s her next of kin? I am. No, we need someone who’s related to her. Me. We’re married. Maybe in California, honey, but not in New York.

In the end, they left Jaye wrapped in a white sheet, and assigned a young patrolman to keep an eye on the body. The kid had been a rookie beat cop in the neighborhood, and remembered Genesis as a friendly face. “You always used to say hello and offer me a cup of tea in the winter,” he said, repaying the kindness by giving them some space. Gen lay down on the linoleum floor next to Jaye, talked to her for awhile, and finally fell asleep.

Rushkoff has a theory about Jaye’s last days. Maybe, he says, she’d actually been dead when she’d had the first seizure. And maybe she’d been allowed to come back—granted a special dispensation—for a few more crazy moments with Gen, like Emily in Our Town. Stranger things have happened.

A few months later, as Gen and I walk beside the elevated subway tracks near his apartment, he suddenly stops, steadies himself with a hand on my elbow, and fumbles in his pocket for an inhaler. He’s having a bout of pneumonia, his third in two years. “She used to tell me to take care of myself,” he says, tears filling his eyes. “I’ve lost my nurse. I’ve lost everything.”

We make our way to his favorite local restaurant, a heavily mirrored Dominican diner that’s decorated with autographed pictures of local baseball players, and settle into a booth. “Corona?” asks a waitress, who seems to know him well. “Thank you, dear,” Gen says.

Pneumonia isn’t his only worry. The same healer who first spotted Jaye’s cancer has found three tumors in his brain, clinging to his pituitary gland—a diagnosis confirmed by conventional doctors. “They can go in through the roof of your mouth and try to cut them out,” he says, sipping his beer, “but that can blind you, which isn’t something we particularly fancy.” The tumors are presumably benign, but he’s planning to go in for a scan to make sure…

Read more.

Posted in Anamolous Phenomena/ Forteana, Human Sexuality, Magic(k), Philosophy & Religion & Spirituality | Tagged: , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »

Meta-Magick: The Book of Atem – NOW AVAILABLE!

Posted by invizweb on June 27, 2008

Yes… At long last… The trade paperback edition of Meta-Magick: The Book of
Atem is now available!

Amazon.com is listing it as IN STOCK at a discount price of $10.17 plus shipping:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/1578634245?ie=UTF8&tag=hawkridgprod-20&linkCode=as2&camp=1789&creative=9325&creativeASIN=1578634245

And we’ve got signed copies at the regular retail price here:

http://www.hawkridgeproductions.com/goods/atem.html

Meta-Magick: The Book of Atem
by Philip H. Farber

Foreword by Douglas Rushkoff

NOW IN STOCK.

“Meta-Magick is a brilliant and patently original book of magical
instruction that future generations will revere as an ‘ancient classic.'” – Lon
Milo DuQuette, author of My Life with the Spirits and Enochian Vision Magick

“Philip H. Farber in his new book has once again shown where Magick
meets the brain.” – Richard Bandler, co-founder of NLP

“The intent of Farber’s ongoing literary sigil is to move his readers
beyond the practice of individual magicks into the shared space of collective,
consensual hallucination…. Farber quickly branches out in new directions –
casting a visionary world picture as if it were a guide book, a description and
instruction manual to a realm that is quite literally created in the process of
its depiction and subsequent imagination.” – Douglas Rushkoff, author of
Coercion and Media Virus

“Years ago, Aleister Crowley published books he considered to be
talismans. In Meta-Magick: The Book of Atem, Philip H. Farber has produced a
book that each reader turns into an evoked entity. It is a unique linking of
ancient techniques of magick combined with modern science and advanced
Neuro-Linguistic Programming and even includes concepts that would be at home in
Gibson’s Neuromancer. Atem uses the ancient concept of evocation while eschewing
needless excesses that have evolved around the techniques over centuries.
Instead of relying on objectively questionable external entities, the book
reveals how to bring forth and direct specific inner qualities. The result
combines personal power with practical simplicity in the first book on the
subject that moves evocation into the 21st century.” – Donald Michael Kraig,
author of Modern Magick

“Phil Farber has a genius for transformative edu-tainment. His writing
captures the warmth and liveliness of his workshops because multisensory
experiential processes are part of every page. In decades of magickal
experimentation and hypnotherapy practice I have never seen such a concise
digest of contemporary techniques for invoking desirable qualities and banishing
negative ones from the attentional field. It is arguably the ONLY Magick or NLP
book you will ever need… Whether you are healing, exploring or aspiring this
is a journey to the frontiers of consciousness, the cutting edge of human
potential. ” – Iona Miller, co-author of The Modern Alchemist.

Posted in Cryptopolitics, Magic(k), Philosophy & Religion & Spirituality | Tagged: , , , , , , , | Leave a Comment »